Data and Analysis Project
Assignment 1
- Proposal


In bringing water to a boiling point, what is the relationship in time versus volume?

I would like to investigate two quantatative variables, time and volume, in bringing water to a boil. I am going to measure the time it takes for each set volume of water to reach a boiling point. I will start with 1/2 cup of water, and increase in increments of a 1/2 cup up to 15 cups of water. I will be measuring the water with the same 1 cup and 1/2 cup measuring cups. I will utilize the same uncovered pot, and the same electric stove burner. Water will start as cold tap water. I expect that with each increase of volume of water there will also be an increase in time. I would like to study the trend of expected increase of time with increase in volume, and determine the pattern.

Assignment 2-
Data Collection Summary:




Volume
Time
15
1380
14.5
1290
14
1280
13.5
1210
13
1190
12.5
1180
12
1140
11.5
980
11
885
10.5
870
10
825
9.5
780
9
770
8.5
775
8
722
7.5
675
7
637
6.5
535
6
525
5.5
465
5
420
4.5
373
4
365
3.5
300
3
250
2.5
190
2
170
1.5
105
1
105
0.5
70

SD of
x=
y=

4.401704
400.8475
Mean of
x=7.75
y=682.07
r=
0.995359

Summary:
Prior to beginning this experiment, I was very interested to find if there would be a similar trend in each data set, by increasing the volume of water boiled by ½ c. each time. (example: additional 30 seconds for each ½ c. of water added. So if 5 c. was 420 seconds, 5 ½ c. would be 450, 6 c. would be 480, and so on.) It was interesting to discover that there was no similar pattern between each data set, other than the trend of increased time for increased volume.

It was fun actually performing this experiment, and discovering that experiments are challenging! I identified some possible unexpected lurking variables, despite my efforts to eliminate them! I was careful in deciding to use the same pot for each data measurement, no cover, and the same electric burner. I collected the data over a time period of several days, and what I identified as a possible lurking variable, was that each time I began collecting the data for that day, the electric burner may not have been as warmed up as it was at the end of collecting data. Another possible lurking variable I identified was that the pot was likely more warmed up at the end of the data collecting period than at the beginning, possibly making the boil time shorter at the end of the period than it would have been at the beginning. Things came up that I couldn’t have planned for, and wouldn’t have known had I not performed the experiment myself. But I learned, which taught me through experience you can fine tune experiments and make them more accurate with multiple attempts.

It was interesting to see the data that I collected in the form of a scatterplot graph! While I was documenting my data on paper, it was difficult to see a trend. In viewing it in graph form, it is easy to see the line slope up, putting the data into perspective.

In using a least-square regression line equation, one would be able to predict that in boiling say, 60 c. of water, it would take around 5,616 seconds.

To determine this, I used the equation of a line: y=a+bx
I took two points on the graph that were not outliers, and were a good distance apart, to calculate the slope of the line:
(1280 – 250) / 14 – 3 = 93.6
Y= (0) + 93.6(x)
To check this, I’ll use 3 c. water.
Y= 93.6 (3) = 280 (which is close to the actual measurement of 250)

In considering the slope of the line on the scatterplot, it is evident that with an increase in volume of water comes an increase in time for it to reach a boil.